Churches, temples or prayer halls are the refuges of people in Ukraine. Intuitively they hide in them from Russian missiles, because even church buildings are not immune to war.




reportage
Krasnohorivka

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Now a mortar is flying somewhere. Amid these grave sounds, Mrs. Tatana, who takes care of the dwelling with her friend, escorts me through the Protestant prayer hall in Krasnohorivka.

Listen to Special Reporter Martin Dorazin’s report

There was a large hall that needed repair. On the upper floor there was a dormitory, a children’s room and a toilet. Everything is equipped.

As Mrs. Taťána says, it was a house of culture bought by the church and was about to be repaired. After the bombing, the place caught fire, including the wooden ceiling. The firefighters and firefighters did not arrive in time, everything burned down.

And again, it was not a military target. People came here to pray.

Prayer must have helped

The women remained in Krasnohorivka, Donetsk Oblast, although they could evacuate to safety. But they serve the dwelling. They say that as long as people are coming, they should be here. On Sunday, many people visited the prayer hall as there were not enough chairs. Usually there are sixty, but 150 came.

Mrs. Tatiana | Photo: Martin Dorazin | Source: Czech Radio

Mrs. Taťana’s son witnessed the beginning of the war in the town of Buča near Kyiv.

“They ended up in the basement, they no longer had water or electricity. Their friend was supposed to take them on February 23, but he got stuck there too. They stayed there until they ate some food, but then they tried to escape. The Russians wouldn’t let them go as we prayed from For five hours, the son negotiated with them, under bombardment, with tanks, in front of machine guns, and begged the Russians to let them go. They shot at the convoy ahead, but in the end they released them.”

life between explosions

I have buckwheat porridge, sausage, preserved meat and grapes growing around.


Voice: “Come early, we won’t have fun anymore.” A reporter in Ukraine witnessed a Russian attack

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Few people stayed in Krasnohorivka. Sometimes a car just passes by. Who else will live in this. During the day, there are several explosions per minute, and at night the situation is worse. It is evidence of fierce fighting on the line between Russian-backed separatists and Ukrainian forces.

Mr. Chika Chika came to the church water center. As he himself says, there has been no electricity for two months. All eruptions come from the neighboring region of Marinca.

“Marinka has not been around for a long time, just as Krasnohorivka will not. I lived a short distance from here in the suburbs, but I couldn’t stand it, so we moved here. My dad is 86 years old. He doesn’t want more eviction. I have to take care of him, so my wife and I will stay here. And everything is in the hands of God.”

A black cat named Schwartz testifies to getting used to life between explosions. Follow me for a few minutes. Wants to be around people.

Martin Dorazin

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