The city’s Plato Gallery is moving to the repaired slaughterhouse in Ostrava, an icon and listed building from the end of the 19th century, and will open its first gallery there next week. Ostrava architect Tadesz Gorečka, who worked with Polish architects to transform the slaughterhouse, praises collaboration with conservationists, and architectural historian Benjamin Fragner explains why the reconstructed building looks so filthy.




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The Ostrava slaughterhouse arose at the end of the 19th century, but has gradually deteriorated since the 1990s.

“In the mid-nineties, the building was declared a cultural monument, but one can still notice how individual parts are falling off, something is torn down, something is plastered, something is painted. I consider what has now been built to be one of the best examples on conversion processes in the Czech Republic in recent years,” emphasizes historian Architect Fragner, who works in the Industrial Heritage Research Center at the Faculty of Architecture of the Czech Technical University.

City Gallery Plato is currently moving to the repaired slaughterhouse in Ostrava

Architect Gorechka commends the collaboration with conservationists. “Everyone understood that the building was on the brink of destruction and tried to find common pros and solutions. Surprisingly, there is no problem here. Recently, we have had good experience with conservation professionals, they are on the side of unconventional solutions, and they are looking for solutions together.”

According to him, memorials also appreciate the fact that the architects left a “distorted facade”. “The erosion of matter that occurred in subsequent years is also part of history and an example of our relationship to heritage.”


Ostrava opened the renovated buildings of the historic building of the city slaughterhouse. There is an exhibition for them

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However, the residents of Ostrava were less receptive to the reconstruction, as the architect admits: “Some did not understand, for example, that the whole building, as it is, was left in the dirt. They would like to have it completely new and balanced. But the building on the ground floor Wrong, moreover, the spirit level was not used much at the time of construction.Brick seams are wavy and smooth.

“Not everyone is too old to accept reality as it is. He would like it to be better. But we didn’t want it that way. As the author of Whole Reconstruction said Robert Konechny, it’s valuable, It is so ugly that it is beautiful,” emphasizes the architect.

Architectural historian Fragner agrees with this, too. “The industrial landmarks were dominated by what architect Karel Hubáček referred to as washing, straightening, improving, and cleaning,” notes one of the most respected Czech architects and transmitter author at Ještěd.

“The development is directed towards a certain originality of the material, that is, the preservation of the individual layers of construction and time, not only the creation and construction, but also the use of the thing. Tracing time and the effect of use has an aesthetic value that must be calculated and enriches the perception of the thing. This was achieved in the Ostrava slaughterhouse”, stresses Fragner .

Listen to the entire discussion in the audio.

Sasa Michaelides, Lenka Buryankova, a cat

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