In November last year, Prague 7 delivered the first repaired tunnel to Vltavska in Prague. For two and a half million crowns, the unused alley under the bridge near the metro station was transformed into new pinks and reds, and a basketball hoop and skate or BMX furniture were added. Three quarters of a year later, the place became unknown again.

At the same time, the reconstruction of the subway, which was previously called Alley of Horrors, was recognized among architects a few months ago. The project from U/U Studio was nominated among the 29 best buildings last year as part of the Czech Architecture Prize. And although visitor regulations state that users must not damage the playground or furniture in any way, the design is hidden under a layer of spray paint a few months after the rebuilding.

According to Deputy Mayor Hana Testikova, Town Hall knew about the sprinklers, but there was no point in fighting them here: “We didn’t take down the signs and drawings on the walls at all. They were already visible before the alterations, during implementation and after the opening of the reconstructed subway. Remove the graffiti in these The condition will only result in unnecessary recurring expenses, and due to the street concept of the entire space, the graffiti is unimportant.”

But signs are also circulating outside the skate park. In the surrounding streets, there are stickers on the facades of houses, window sills and doors. In the future, the Vltava Philharmonic site should be here.

Read in the gallery how Prague 7 solves the situation.

#nice #reconstruction #Prague #Vltavsky #subway #graffiti